CSI Supports: How to avoid digital burnout

An illustration of a person slumped at their work desk with their face resting on their laptop.

In her new book — Attention: A Love Story — Casey Schwartz considers the role of attention in defining us. She cautions that as our attention spans have shortened to a period of fewer than ten seconds, we are losing hours of our daily lives to anxiety-inducing digital distractions. In Vanity Fair, Mary Alice Miller unpacks the ways these impacts are being ramped up during COVID-19, and the opportunity we all have to do better.

“This version of togetherness—in which connection must happen through the same medium as work, errands, and news-gathering—contributes to a special type of exhaustion, one that had already been brewing for three decades as our lives transitioned into their virtual expressions. Now, forced to live 100% of the time in what tech ethicist James Williams has described as a “new mode of deep distraction,” it seems the pandemic has expedited an inevitable breaking point. “This is a unique opportunity,” Schwartz said, “to rethink our relationship to constant stimulation.”

Constant stimulation is what causes Digital Burnout, which we want to help you avoid (particularly right now). COVID-19 has introduced many new challenges and adjustments to our work, whether we’re working remotely, looking for work, or working longer hours. Setting healthy boundaries, managing and restoring our energy, and navigating increased screen time are just a few of the many challenges we’re confronted with.

So in partnership with The Burnout Project and Hydra Labs, CSI is offering an action-oriented workshop to help you:

  • Connect with others navigating stress, productivity, and burnout.
  • Explore and unpack sources of burnout
  • Learn the signs and signals of high stress
  • Learn ways to manage your energy and time during COVID-19
  • Build healthy habits for a post-pandemic world

(The fee for this workshop is $20, but no one will be turned away due to their financial situation. Please a message to theburnoutproject@gmail.com if cost is a barrier.)

#StayAtHome activity: Enjoying CSI’s Art & Art History Club

Quote by Tara Marina Pearson. "What a joy: To open up a zoom meeting and be confronted by art."

Every Tuesday at 5 pm, the CSI Art & Art History Club meets on Zoom to learn, create, and share together. I’ve been meaning to go for the last four weeks and finally took the plunge after some encouragement from Community Animator Tara Marina Pearson.

Friendly faces welcome me when I log in to my first CSI Art Club. Some people have been here every week and some, like me, are new. After a few introductions the evening’s leader, Richa Narvekar, one of a group of CSI DECAs (that also includes Charles Ozzoude, Pamela Schuller, and Sair Raut) who are leading this program, starts us off by sharing two paintings on her screen.

We’re asked to decide which of the two images we like best. The conversation flows easily as more members trickle in. We all agree: the one on the right is our favourite. After we’ve all had a chance to explain why, Richa talks us through each painting. 

Two examples of art by members of the club.

We learn that our favourite piece is Nocturne in Black and Gold – The Falling Rocket by James Abbott McNeill Whistler. It’s a darkly whimsical piece, depicting Cremorne Gardens in London and the sparks of fireworks in the distance. I learn that Whistler often named his pieces after music and that he was inspired by Japanese artists. The second piece is Broadway Boogie Woogie by Piet Mondrian, a painting inspired by New York City, the Boogie Woogie music popular there in the 1940s, and the patterns that underlay it. Richa asks us to take another look at the painting with this in mind. “What do you see?” “A grid! Subway map! A city for sure.” Richa shares a video with us, an animated version of Mondrian’s work complete with bluesy boogie woogie music in the background. 

She explains that both Whistler and Mondrian painted at the birth of abstraction: they were drawing not what they saw, but what they felt lay underneath

What ties them together? Music. Whistler’s Nocturnes have been compared to Chopin’s Nocturnes: melancholy whimsical shifts between light and dark. Mondrian is famous for having organized his whole world into a tight vocabulary of lines, primary colours, and shapes, which he likened to chords in music. So, Richa says, music is our theme for the night. Using the magic of a Zoom poll, we chose between two drawing prompts: listening to blues or classical. We choose classical and are swept away by a Youtube video of “Danse Macabre” by Camile Saint-Saëns while we take time to draw in our separate homes, through our separate screens, in our separate lives.

The music ends and I find myself laughing. In front of me is a terrifying drawing of what I assumed would look like forest but instead looks like flaming Hershey’s kisses, a Doonesbury-esque character in a very sad sleigh, and a tree branch. We play the music for a second time and I remember I have an eraser. It doesn’t help and it doesn’t matter. No one cares what my forest looks like; they’re just glad I’m trying.

Two examples of art by members of the art history club.

When we share our work everyone is attentive and gracious with their feedback. They don’t offer tips and tricks, or guidance about branch shading. And frankly, I don’t need it. I mean – I do, I desperately do – but not right now. What I need right now, in the middle of this thing, this always-in-my-office-because-my-home-is-my-office-and-I’m-not-allowed-to-be-anywhere else thing, is a creative outlet, a chance to be less seperate, to connect with new people. 

Members of the Art History Club showing off their creations in a zoom call.

And at CSI’s Art & Art History Club I get what I want: conversation, laughter, a chance to stretch my creative comfort zone, an opportunity to learn. When we sign off for the evening I look at the grid of smiles on and know that the rest of the Club gets it too.

Maybe we’re all abstract artists right now, reacting to the sudden starkness of real life, drawing new paths to joy, carving out new connections, and crafting new ways of being.

CSI Supports: How to Apply for CESB

As COVID-19 is increasing economic uncertainty and insecurity across the country, companies are cancelling co-op placements and full-time positions alike. To support students and recent graduates, the Federal government created the Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB).

This taxable benefit provides eligible students with $1,250 a month for four consecutive months, from May to August 2020.

You may be able to get an additional $750 for each 4-week period if you meet at least one of the following requirements:

  • You have a disability
  • You have at least one child under 12 years old, or other dependants

Before you start, make sure you check your eligibility with our handy Instagram post! Also note:

  • You cannot apply for the CESB if you have applied for CERB or EI
  • If you are currently unemployed, you will eventually have to show proof that you are actively applying for a job

If you determine that the CESB is right for you, you’ll be able to apply this weekend! Here is a screen-by-screen breakdown of what that process looks like.

Step 1: Determine your eligibility periods with the chart below.

If you are eligible for the May 10 – June 6 period, you can apply beginning Friday May 15, 2020. If you are not, you can check the earliest day you can apply here.

Step 2: Go to CRA MyAccount. You should see the screen below. Choose from one of these two options to log in. If you use online banking, you can choose “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” and sign in the same way you would to your online banking. (For the purpose of this walk-through, we will be demonstrating sign-in via sign-in partner.)

Step 3: When you click “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” you will get this pop-up. If it is your day to apply, click the “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” button again.

Step 4: Click on the logo of your bank or credit union. If your bank or credit union isn’t on the list, you will have to navigate back to the login screen and login via CRA. If you do not have a CRA login, this video shows how to sign up for one.

Step 5: You will be taken to your online banking sign-in screen, with a “Secure Key Concierge” logo in the top right corner. This is what that screen looks like for TD Canada Trust; all the interfaces are pretty similar.

Step 6: After you have logged in via your online banking details, you will be taken to a screen that looks like this. There will be a light cyan box specifically about COVID-19 Emergency Support. Click the “Apply” button in that box.

CRA Apply for Emergency Support

Step 7: Select the support payment that you’re applying for (CESB). Note that you cannot apply for CESB if you have already applied for CERB or EI!

Select a support payment

Step 8: Indicate whether or not you have a disability and/or a child under 12 or other dependants.

Step 9: You will be taken to this screen, which breaks down the Eligibility for CESB. If you meet the criteria, click on “Select a period”. A drop-down menu will appear that says “May 10, 2020 to June 6, 2020” (that will be the only option for now).

CESB Eligibility

Step 10: You will be taken to a screen to certify that you meet all of the criteria. You will need no documentation to prove your eligibility. (The $5000 you are required to have earned could have happened between either January 1 2019 to January 1 2020 or April 11 2019 to April 11 2020.)

CESB Certification of Eligibility

Step 11: You will be taken to a screen to confirm that your banking information is correct. Make sure the money is being deposited into an account you have access to! If it is not, click “update direct deposit” and navigate through that process.

CESB Confirm Direct Deposit Information

Step 12: That’s it! You’re done! You should get your deposit in three business days!

CESB Confirmation Screen

Hopefully this was helpful! Remember that you will have to re-apply for the next month! Make sure you set up a reminder on your phone, online calendar, or planner to go through the process again the week of June 8. (You will still have to be actively looking for work to remain eligible!)

We will update this doc if any part of the process changes. If you are looking for other types of information or support right now, check out CSI Supports.

CSI Supports: Resources for New and Expecting Parents

Preparing to bring a life into the world is in itself an act of hope and joy, though not without its own host of worries. With all the uncertainty brought upon by a pandemic, health concerns can get amplified.

We’ve gathered a few resources to help you wade through the sea of information, and find any help you might need.

CURATING EVIDENCE-BASED INFORMATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

The good news? There’s currently no evidence of mother-to-child transmission through childbirth.

However, pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase the risk of other illnesses, such as viral respiratory infections like COVID-19. That’s why pregnant families need to take precautions. This includes:

  • Physical distancing
  • Washing hands often
  • Staying at home as much as possible (e.g. seeing if you can attend medical appointments through a video call)

The Government of Canada has put together a fact sheet for new and expecting parents that you can find here.

PROVIDING SUPPORT TO BLACK FAMILIES

Mommy Monitor, a CSI Spadina member, has mobilized to support Black families. They are currently conducting a survey to better understand the needs of these families!

They’ve also curated information and evidence-based recommendations for parents-to-be on their website.

CONNECTING PARENTS TO POSTPARTUM SUPPORT

Another CSI member, Birth Mark, helps pregnant people and parents from marginalized or at-risk communities navigate the entire reproductive journey.

As services for postpartum parents have decreased, Birth Mark stepped in to fill the gap. Doula on Demand is a 24/7 service, connecting Birth Mark clients to postpartum doulas. It’s a way to get emotional and evidence-based support related to coping, parenting, or taking care of yourself and your baby.

MANAGING STRESS AND STAYING POSITIVE

Taking care of a newborn while dealing with the realities of a pandemic is, to say the least, very stressful. When you feel frustrated, the World Health Organization suggests this brief meditation exercise:

  1. Set up: Find a comfortable sitting position, your feet flat on the floor, your hands resting in your lap. Close your eyes if you feel comfortable.
  2. Think, feel, body: Notice your thoughts. Notice if they are negative or positive. Notice how you feel emotionally. Notice if your feelings are happy or not. Notice how your body feels. Notice anything that hurts or is tense.
  3. Focus on your breath: Listen to your breath as it goes in and out. You can put a hand on your stomach and feel it rise and fall with each breath. You may want to say to yourself “It’s okay. Whatever it is, I am okay.” Then just listen to your breath for a while.
  4. Come back: Notice how your whole body feels. Listen to the sounds in the room.
  5. Reflect: Ask yourself “Do I feel different at all?” When you’re ready, open your eyes.

From family budgeting to talking to your kids about COVID-19, the WHO has tips for parents of all stages.


Looking for more resources? We’ve curated a number of other supports and fun #StayAtHome activities!


Header Photo by Laura Garcia from Pexels

CSI Supports: 4 Kid-Friendly #StayAtHome Activities

The closure of schools and daycares means that all-day childcare now falls on the parents. Balancing work, life, and childcare is stressful enough by itself.

The Canadian Paediatric Society offers a few words of support:

“It is not going to be easy, but what if we focused on what we can do instead of what we can’t? We can support our children’s health, learning and development even if we can’t be their teachers. We can rebuild relationships with ourselves, our children, our families and our communities even if we can’t be out and about. We can do this if we work together, take it one step at a time, and focus on eating well, sleeping well and playing.”

Right now, what’s important is the physical and mental health of you and your family. We’re all doing our best to get by, so it’s okay not to operate “as normal” and have some fun instead.

So without further ado, here are a few #StayAtHome activities you can try with your little ones.

  1. Decorate rocks with messages of hope and leave them around the neighbourhood. This Peel District School Board librarian showed us how it’s done!
  2. Paint an uplifting scene or some kind words on your window (or on paper that you can tape to your window, if you’re feeling less risky)
  3. Make cards for senior citizens at your nearby long-term care home! (Make sure you call ahead to see if it’s something they’re open to, and how to get your cards to them.)
  4. Let your kids go on an adventure! Cosmic Kids Yoga has 30-60 minute videos that teach your kids yoga and mindfulness through their favourite books and movies.

BONUS: We all love a good story, but when you’re not in the mood to be a narrator, you can turn to some friendly faces and voices online!

  • CSI member S. Bear Bergman is hosting a daily story time via Facebook Live, reading books from his children’s publishing company Flamingo Rampant
  • CBC has curated a list of “live read-alouds” from Canadian children’s writers and illustrators
  • Audible is offering a selection of kids audiobooks for free

Looking for more #StayAtHome activity ideas? We’ve got you. (Plus, check out our full list of community supports here!)


Photo by Humphrey Muleba on Unsplash

CSI Supports: Our CEO explains why we are launching a community rent pool

A lot of people might think a pandemic would be the end of a non-profit social enterprise space. And it’s a fair concern; COVID-19 hit us hard. One day we were sailing along all scrappy and hunky dory, and the next — just like so many of you — we’d lost a huge chunk of our revenue but still had the expense of mortgage payments and staff salaries.

Disaster, right? Well, maybe not.

CSI has always been much more than a physical space. We’re a community. So when the realities of COVID-19 sunk in, our first thoughts were of our members and how we could help them get through it.

As a first step, we conducted a survey to see how they were faring. Among other questions, we asked what their desired rent or membership arrangement would be to help them through these unprecedented times

The answers we got — collected in our CSI COVID-19 Impact Report — were grim but unsurprising. Fewer than half of our members felt they would be able to continue paying their full rent amounts.

So, what do you do? And how do you actually live your values when faced with a situation none of us had ever even imagined?

I actually believe that how all of us conduct ourselves during this pandemic will define how we are judged for years. And so we said to ourselves: This is our community. These are our constituents. These are the people we serve.

The idea that we would actually just evict them is unthinkable. Instead, we did what we’ve done from day one. We turned towards each other and we innovated.

This meant coming back to our core values. And we thought “Which of our values are most important for how we craft a solution to this problem?”

So the first one of course was community and collectivism. If we really are a community, how does the community respond? What does a good community do?

A good community doesn’t leave anyone behind.

At CSI, we have a profound desire to model the world we want. We didn’t want to come in with like “Here is a 20% cut across the board” or say “Well, you’re in or you’re out.” And so it was a really interesting process, because it pushed us back to what really matters. Which is people, and how we work together to solve problems.

I also had faith that our members would want to help out, too. To do what they could, and contribute what they could to the collective.

With this in mind, we offered a range of payment options and turned the idea into a Community Rent Pool – effectively a pay-what-you-can rent model – in an effort to provide maximum flexibility for our members as they grapple with so many challenges that COVID-19 has brought.

When we brought the idea of the Community Rent Pool to our Board of Directors, they were incredibly supportive. They actually gave me permission to be more bold. They told me “Take the Moon Shot, Tonya. Live your values. Step up.”

So we did. We essentially said to our members “You don’t have to pay, but we invite you to pay.” It was a real leap of faith. And so far, we’ve collected about 56% of our revenue. 56% of our dollars are coming in through the community rent pool.

In addition to these funds, we are also getting love letters from members about their fellow members. People are responding and telling us “I wish the rest of the world could be just like CSI?”

That’s the kind of stuff where you just think “Wow”.

And there is a real recognition from our community that the social connection is key. Our connection as people. People do need people and these connections are critical, and that’s who we are.

We are social creatures. And I’m feeling very very proud of our community.

 

CSI Supports: What is the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy?

As COVID-19 touches nearly every aspect of the economy, the federal government has been working to mitigate some of the impacts. For Canadian workers (include the self-employed), the Canada Emergency Response Benefit offers $2000 a month for those who have seen their income reduced to less than $1000 a month due to COVID-19.

If you operate a business or not-for-profit that has lost money because of the pandemic, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy could help. The CEWS will pay 75% of employee wages on the first $58700 that an employee earns, up to a maximum of $847 a week, for employers who have seen the required reduction in revenue.

Those revenue reductions are explained below:

To be eligible to receive the wage subsidy, you must:

  • Be an eligible employer
  • Have experienced an eligible reduction in revenue, and
  • Have had a CRA payroll account on March 15, 2020

Eligible remuneration includes amounts you paid an employee including:

  • Salary
  • Wages
  • Other taxable benefits
  • Fees and commissions.

Eligible employees don’t have to live in Canada, but they have to be employed in Canada by an eligible employer during the claim period.

Additionally:

  • Employees who have been laid off or furloughed can become eligible retroactively
  • Their retroactive pay and status meet the eligibility criteria for the claim period
  • You must rehire and pay such employees before you include them in your calculation for the subsidy

To get a sense of what kind of support your business or organization could get from the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, this calculator tool will help you estimate the amount of your wage subsidy.

You will be asked for information such as the number of eligible employees and gross payroll, and will be able to preview your subsidy claim, based on information you enter.

As we did for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit, we will soon be offering a step-by-step guide through the application process.

CSI Supports: 5 ways to reduce “Zoom fatigue”

Depending on your job or industry, you might be spending a lot more time on video calls lately. While it’s nice to see the (ideally) smiling faces of our friends and co-workers, these calls are not without their frustrations.

It’s kind of hard to believe that in 2020, we’re still having to use the first ten minutes of meetings saying things like “Wait, now I can see you but not hear you. I’m gonna log out and log back in.” But here we are!

Technical difficulties are one thing. But as a recent article on the BBC’s website explains, there are mental and emotional challenges as well. Here are a few of the reasons:

Non-verbal clues:
“Video chats mean we need to work harder to process cues like facial expressions, the tone and pitch of the voice, and body language; paying more attention to these consumes a lot of energy.”

Cognitive dissonance:
“Our minds are together when our bodies feel we’re not. That dissonance, which causes people to have conflicting feelings, is exhausting. You cannot relax into the conversation naturally.”

Silence:
One 2014 study by German academics showed that delays on phone or conferencing systems shaped our views of people negatively: even delays of 1.2 seconds made people perceive the responder as less friendly or focused.”

Self-consciousness:
“When you’re on a video conference, you know everybody’s looking at you; you are on stage, so there comes the social pressure and feeling like you need to perform. Being performative is nerve-wracking and more stressful.”

So what are a bunch of quarantining folks to do if they — like us! — want to move IRL hangouts to online? Happily, experts have some tips:

  1. Limiting video calls to those that are necessary.
  2. Having turning your camera on be optional.
  3. Turning your screen off to the side, instead of facing it head-on.
  4. Take time during meetings to catch up before diving into business.
  5. Build transition periods in between video meetings

If you’re still feeling like your webcam is sapping your lifeforce, Gianpiero Petriglieri — an associate professor studying sustainable learning and development in the workplace — has one last suggestion: Go old school. “Write a letter to someone instead of meeting them on Zoom,” he suggests. “Tell them you really care about them.”


We don’t have time to send you all letters, but we really care about you! Check out our CSI Supports page to find out how we are here for you during the COVID-19 crisis.

Self-care ideas in the time of COVID-19

Photo of red couch pillow and cup of hot chocolate looking out through a window to the road

Right now, we’re sailing through uncharted waters. There’s a shared sense of anxiety and uneasiness about the future. And physical distancing, while necessary, can amplify the loneliness we feel.

That’s why, right now, the priority shouldn’t be to spend all of your “newfound” time working, or learning a new skill, or picking up old hobbies. As we navigate through these stormy seas, what’s most important is putting your physical and mental health first.

Here are some self-care ideas and online mental health resources to help get you through the next little bit!

Connect from afar

Friends and family are, quite literally, one phone call away. Our screens are connecting us to the people we can’t see in person.

This could mean calling up an old university roommate for a virtual coworking session. This could mean watching a TV show or movie with a good friend using Kosmi or Netflix Party. This could mean joining one of CSI’s virtual rituals and chatting about the mundane with some familiar faces.

Make time to relax

Take a moment to ground yourself, calm your breathing, and clear your mind. Light a scented candle, take a long hot shower, or bask in the afternoon sun.

Headspace is offering a free selection of meditation, sleep, and other resources to help guide you through this!

Get some fresh air

Breathing in fresh air and absorbing the sun can do wonders for your mood. This can be as simple as watching the sunset or doing some reading on your balcony or front porch!

When you feel ready to stretch your legs, take a stroll around the neighbourhood. (Don’t forget to smile at other wayfarers you pass by — from a safe distance apart!)

Channel energy into a good workout

Lots of gyms, yoga, and dance studios are offering virtual classes to help pass the time while we stay inside. Some instructors and choreographers are also teaching classes online, so check their Instagram or YouTube pages to see what they’re up to!

CSI member Catherine Chan launched FitIn Live. A $10 day pass gives you access to a full day of livestreamed fitness and mental health classes run by local instructors!

Find solace in art and photography

Art is a wonderful way to express emotions! You could have your own paint night by following along a Bob Ross video, or spend an afternoon colouring in images based on the collections of over a hundred libraries, archives, and cultural institutions.

Peer-to-peer mental health support

CSI Regent Park member Big White Wall is an online community where users can support each other. They also offer self-guided courses, self-assessments, and creative tools to help you express how you’re feeling. Trained practitioners are available 24/7 and each user is protected by anonymity, so they can feel safe sharing how they feel.

Big White Wall is free for all residents of Ontario aged 16 and older, thanks to funding from the Ontario Government and Ontario Telehealth Network.

Tools and coaching for mental wellness

BounceBack® is a free skill-building program for youth and adults delivered through online videos and phone calls with a coach. It is designed to help adults and youth 15+ manage low mood, mild to moderate depression and anxiety, stress or worry.

Self-care looks different for everyone! As long as it helps take your mind off of the world and brings you a bit of joy, it doesn’t matter what you choose to do.

CSI Supports: CERB application walk-through

IMPORTANT NOTE: The requirements for the Canada Emergency Response Benefits program have opened up.

You are now eligible if all the following apply to you:

  • You reside in Canada
  • You are at least 15 years old
  • You earn less $1000/month
  • You have not voluntarily quit your job
  • You have had income of at least $5,000 in 2019 or in the 12 months prior to the date of your application. (Note: This $5000 does not have to have been earned in Canada

… and at least one of the following applies to you:

  • You have stopped working because of COVID-19
  • You were expecting a seasonal job, but it’s now gone
  • You’ve run out of EI since January 1

Additional note: If you are on EI, you will be automatically moved to CERB while it is available. Once the CERB program is closed, you will be moved back to regular EI.

As COVID-19 is increasing economic uncertainty and insecurity across the country, we want to make sure that everyone gets the support they need.

One of the programs that has been launched is the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (aka CERB). This taxable benefit would provide $2,000 a month for up to four months for workers who lose their income as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

If you determine that the CERB is the best fit for you, you’ll be able to apply this week. Here is a screen-by-screen breakdown of what that process looks like. (We are including the address bar in the images so you can check to make sure you are on the right page!)

Step one: Check out this chart to determine which day you should apply:

Step two: On your application date, go to CRA MyAccount. You should see the screen below. Choose from one of these two options to log in. If you use online banking, you can choose “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” and sign in the same way you would to your online banking. (For the purpose of this walk-through, we will be demonstrating sign-in via sign-in partner.)

Step three: When you click “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” you will get this pop-up. If it is your day to apply, click the “Sign-in Partner Login / Register” button again.

Step four: Click on the logo of your bank or credit union. If your bank or credit union isn’t on the list, you will have to navigate back to the login screen and login via CRA. If you do not have a CRA login, this video shows how to sign up for one.

Step five: You will be taken to your online banking sign-in screen, with a “Secure Key Concierge” logo in the top right corner. This is what that screen looks like for TD Canada Trust; all the interfaces are pretty similar.

Step six: After you have logged in via your online banking details, you will be taken to a screen that looks like this. There will be a light cyan box specifically about the CERB. Click the “Apply” button in that box.

Step seven: You will be taken to this screen, which breaks down the Eligibility for CERB. If you meet the criteria, click on “Select a period”. A drop-down menu will appear that says “March 15 to April 11, 2020” (that will be the only option).

Step eight: You will be taken to a screen to certify that you meet all of the criteria. You will need no documentation to prove your eligibility. (The $5000 you are required to have earned could have happened between either January 1 2019 to January 1 2020 or April 11 2019 to April 11 2020.)

Step nine: You will be taken to a screen to confirm that your banking information is correct. Make sure the money is being deposited into an account you have access to! If it is not, click “update direct deposit” and navigate through that process.

Step ten: That’s it! You’re done! You should get your $2000 deposit in three business days!

We hope this has been helpful; remember that you will have to do it again next month! If you use an online calendar or day planner, make a note to remind yourself to go through the process again the week of May 11. We will update this doc if any part of the process changes. If you are looking for other types of information or support right now, check out CSI Supports.